Birds

Legions of tiny black and white birds are moving south from Canada in droves. Consider these reports (keyed on the map): Banders in Toronto, at Tommy Thompson Park along Lake Ontario (A on map), band over 200 of these birds…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Hurricane Wilma, a slow-moving category 4 storm, is currently spinning over Cozumel Island off Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. It is expected to remain there for the next 24 to 36 hours. At this point, we are all familiar with the damage…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Any day now, American Tree Sparrows (Spizella arborea) will arrive to spend the winter. They share honors with Red-bellied Woodpeckers and Ring-necked Ducks in being comically misnamed. American Tree Sparrows (tree sparrows for short, although they should not be confused…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

sunday times: duck stamps

October 2, 2005

in Birds

Soon waterfowl will begin streaming through the Great Lakes region. Some will be migrants, some will stay the winter. And some will be shot by hunters. This last fact is good news for all of us. Each of those hunters…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

While we’re talking about swans… My mitten-state neighbor TroutGrrrl over at Science and Sarcasm posted on the Michigan DNR’s request for Trumpeter Swan sightings. She gave a little overview and history of the effort to “reintroduce” Trumpeter Swans to Michigan….

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

In a previous post, I wrote about the difficulty in using lethal control of White-tailed Deer because the public finds deer charismatic and engaging. Another problem species that has many fans in the general public, confounding management, is the Mute…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

My constant companion in the garden is a male House Wren (Troglodytes aedon). Naturalist John Burroughs noted that “Probably we have no other familiar bird keyed up to the same degree of intensity as the house wren.” Indeed, as Burroughs…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

In part 1 of “invisible birds” I described one of the often-heard-but-rarely-seen species I’ve encountered during my breeding bird atlas work, the Yellow-billed Cuckoo. In keeping with the theme of yellow body parts, let me introduce the Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

You rely a lot on your ears when doing bird surveys, especially in the summertime. Thick foliage obstructs views, females are tending nests or young, and unless they are singing from an exposed perch, males may be hard to locate…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Some years I don’t catch many Tennessee Warblers (Vermivora peregrina), but this year seemed to be a good year for them. Their populations surge and wane with outbreaks of spruce budworms (Choristoneura fumiferana) on their northern nesting grounds. The budworms…

{ Comments on this entry are closed }